Click on the paintings to enlarge the images.

Selva Verde 2002

“SELVA VERDE” (Green Jungle) 2 panels
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 48″
Available

Looking up at waterfalls, they often seem to be dropping from the sky. Well, that’s an artist’s imagination!

waterfall-flowers-2011

“WATERFALL FLOWERS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 36″
Available

I love to paint waterfalls. They literally pop out of the landscape, framed by great trees, flowers bursting with color, and cloud-filled skies.  It is Nature as performing art, showing off with a majestic, powerful, and dazzling sight and sound show.

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“ROOTS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax and wire mesh
42″ x 30″
Available

When you closely study the plantlife on a forest floor, it quickly becomes very apparent how one form of life feeds upon or is dependent upon others. The density of plants in a tiny section of the rainforest floor – like the one in this painting – is remarkable. The floor is like a forest city. The intermingling of roots, vines, stems and flowers is as diverse as the intermingling of lives in a large cosmopolitan city. And this lush vegetation holds great importance to mankind. The tropical rainforest is a natural pharmacy. If humans cannot count in having these forests, the world’s medicine chest would be half empty.

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“LEAVES AND COCOON”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 36″
Available

A rainforest close-up.

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“ANOTHER VIEW OF THE RAINFOREST (Rainforest Mists)”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
60″ x 36″
Available

I have often come across beautiful flowers – in this case, a glorious red heliconia – against the backdrop of a misty, mountain rainforest.

Jade Garden

“JADE GARDEN”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
24″ x 36″
Available

Blooms of yellow, red, and white pop out from a jade backdrop.

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“LION TAILS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
30” x 48”
Available

In drier Pacific coastal areas you come across stands of tall pampas grass swaying in the wind.

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“BIRDS AT DUSK”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
24″ x 48″
Available

One day while driving along the Pacific Coast at dusk near Rio Tarcoles I heard this great squawking noise outside. I pulled over and was rewarded with this magnificent avian commute—hundreds of wood storks and herons, noisily winging their way home after a day at work, against the backdrop of a stunning sherbet sky.

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“HOMAGE TO BOBBY – LA FORTUNA WATERFALL”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
108″ x 60″ (3 panels)
Available

The noise of this 200-foot waterfall competes with the constant operatics of shrieking monkeys and toucans. In 1993, a dear friend died in a tragic accident while visiting this spectacular waterfall. The painting was my homage to him.

Rainforest Lake

“RAINFOREST LAKE”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh.
40″ x 30″
Available

Before flowing to the Caribbean, streams converge to form small lakes or lagoons ringed by lush vegetation.  I was always intrigued by the contrast of the deep shadows of the surrounding forest with the bright patches of sunlit water and plant life.  For me, the shadows always held a mysterious allure, full of secrets, unseen wildlife, and timelessness.

_DSC8429 Las Nubes (Rainforest Clouds)

“LAS NUBES” (Rainforest Clouds)
Oil on canvas with marble sand
48” x 24”
Available

Watching the fast-moving rainclouds is a wonderful pastime in Costa Rica.  As a young girl I used to be a sky watcher.  I would look up at the sky and see wondrous shapes and figures in the parade of clouds bringing the daily cargo of rain.  This painting is inspired by the play of clouds over a forest near Guayabo, the largest and most important archeological site in Costa Rica.

Morning. Noon, and Evening P1000805

“MORNING, NOON, AND EVENING”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
108” x 60”
Available

Rainforest forms and colors shift in a changing show with the time of the day.

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“MANUEL ANTONIO BEACH”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
60″ x 48″
Available

Low tide on the Pacific shore near Manuel Antonio National Park left these rocks high and dry.

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“RIO GRANDE DE OROSI”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
48″ x 60″
Available

This churning river cuts through rocks and forest in Costa Rica’s central Orosi valley. This river is thoroughly spectacular and worthy of painting at virtually every twist and turn.

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“RAINFOREST VIEW WITHIN A VIEW”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 36″
Available

The forces of Nature at play that one senses in the rainforest are so powerful and so infinite. How do you contain them within the finite borders of a canvas? This painting is an attempt at a “breakout” of Nature from within an inner framework.

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“HIGUERON”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 48″
Available

This magical tree, standing in the middle of the rainforest, is a member of the ficus family. In this painting I tried to give an impression of the wind in the branches.

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“DEVAS OF THE RAINFOREST”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
30” x 48”
Available

The rainforest is full of magic. And perhaps, if you are lucky and very well rested and your antenna is refined, you may witness some of these exalted, shining beings who are said to be upset at man’s wanton destruction of Nature.

LOMAS-BARBUDAL

“LOMAS BARBUDAL”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
40″ x 30″
Available

This rainforest in Costa Rica’s northwest territory of Guanacaste is not your usual wet, lush forest. Here, the weather is drier than in most other areas of the country. Barbudal is a region known for its insect population, particularly bees and wasps.

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“THE BIRDS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax and wire mesh
60″ x 48″
Available

Costa Rica’s skies and waterways are alive with the motion and chatter of countless birds. The country boasts more species of birds than the continental U.S. and Canada combined. Among the wildlife being protected are some 850 species of birds, of which 625 are resident.

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“BROWN PELICAN”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
32” x 24”
Available

Near Dominical, on the Pacific Coast, you see these squadrons of endangered pelicans swooping down out of the sky to snatch fish out of the water.

Braullio-Carrillo

“BRAULIO CARRILLO”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
60″ x 48″
Available

There is a high rainforest called “Braulio Carrillo” northeast of the capital of San Jose. The road from the city twists down through the lush, wet and often misty mountainous terrain of “Braullio Carrillo.” While driving the road one foggy day I felt suddenly enveloped in a world limited to two colors – ghostlike green images of passing trees against the gray backdrop of the fog.

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“MOUNTAINS AND EVERGREENS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 36″
Available

These tree-clad hills fade from close-up shades of green to distant hues of blue.

Ventanas Windows of the Rainforest

“VENTANAS” (Windows of the Rainforest)
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
72″ x 60″
Available

There is so much to see in the rainforest. Wherever you look, there is the breathtaking wholeness of Nature. I took one such view and, in my studio, “subdivided” it into multiple and imaginary views through windows. Each window view had its own special beauty, and each view made up the glorious life-filled whole.

13. Puerto Viejo

“PUERTO VIEJO”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
72″ x 60″
Available

A beach and inlet on the Caribbean side of Costa Rica, about to be deluged by an oncoming storm.  A perfect drama for the artist to paint.

14. Wild Bananas 36 x 48 1995

“WILD BANANAS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
36″ x 48″
Available

Wild bananas, containing rather noxious seeds, are mostly for the eyes, not the mouth. Costa Rica, like a number of other Latin American countries, is a major exporter of bananas to the world.  Banana trees flourish throughout the country, but it is in the Caribbean lowlands that you find the great plantations. Actually, botanists classify bananas as berries….along with grapes, currants and tomatoes. The fruit originated in Malaysia and the East Indies. Today, bananas are considered to be the most important of all commercial fruits, a rich and nourishing “convenience food” with a pull-down skin that contains potassium, vitamins A & C, and quick energy. In Costa  Rica, as in other tropical countries, you also find a larger, cooking variety called plantain that are widely used as a tasty, starchy food.

mt-chirripo

“MONTE CHIRRIPÓ”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
36” x 36”
Available

This mountain stands 3,800 meters high, the tallest peak in Costa Rica.   Even though the country is tropical, here at the top the weather is cold and the peak freezes almost every night.  On the heights of the mountain, there are lakes of crystal clear waters formed by glaciers, with surrounding forests clad in mystical mists and swirling clouds.  There’s a legend that Monte Chirripó is the ancestral home of the gnomes.

Heliconia good

“HELICONIA”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
26″ x 32″
Available

This colorful plant is found abundantly now in forest clearings in protected national reserves. Years ago, however, people used to come to the forests and cut many of these plants and use them for decoration. Heliconia became so popular for decoration that it became an endangered species. Most of the approximately 194 known species are native to the tropical Americas, but a few are indigenous to certain islands of the western Pacific and Maluku. Many species of Heliconia are found in rainforests or tropical wet forests of these regions. Common names for the genus include lobster-claws, wild plantains or false bird-of-paradise. The last term refers to their close similarity to the bird-of-paradise flowers. Collectively, these plants are also simply referred to as Heliconias.

11. Wet Meadow Landscape 1990 40 x 30

“WET MEADOW LANDSCAPE”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
40″ x 30″
Available

Coming down out of the clouds from one of Costa Rica’s volcanos I saw a number of lush, soggy meadows and overflowing ponds.  This landscape was a composite image of the wet scenes I saw.

Rainforest Road to Carara

“EL CAMINO DEL BOSQUE” (The Rainforest Road: The Road to Carara)
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
40″ x 52″
Available

I was intrigued by this winding road, a thread of modern civilization piercing a timeless forest and an existence which has seen endless seasons and generations of flora and fauna. The road, which brought me through this panorama of natural beauty, was also a symbol of man’s encroachment that is destroying the beauty.

Selection of Purchased Rainforest Paintings (1989 to present)

RositaGottlieb-rainforest-painting

“WATERFALL AT TAPANTI” (TWO PANELS)
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax and wire mesh
96″ x 60″
Sold

This majestic waterfall in Costa Rica’s Tapanti Reserve provides a lush setting and multi-colored possibilities for the artist enchanted by the changing tones and mists throughout the day.

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“EL COCOTERO” (The Palm Tree Grove)
Oil on canvas with marble sand
36″ x 48″
Sold

There are many palm tree groves along the shores of Costa Rica and this is the image that many people have of a tropical paradise – trees ripe with coconuts, and white sandy beaches. As a young girl on vacation with my family at the seashore, I loved to lie on my back on the sandy beach and watch the trees being rocked by the wind…and hear the occasional “plop” of a coconut hitting the ground.

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“WATERFALL”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
72″ x 60″
Sold

Sitting by the edge of a stream in the depths of the forest and listening to the symphony of sounds from wind, water and animals is an experience of bliss for the nature lover. One frequently comes upon waterfalls when walking through forests. This waterfall is a composite of many waterfalls experienced and enjoyed over many years.

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“TREE ON MT. POAS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax and wire mesh
48″ x 60″
Sold

Mt. Poas is one of Costa Rica’s many volcanoes. One day as I was walking on its slopes I saw this lightening-battered tree still projecting virility. It seemed to be defiant and saying to Nature that “I’m still standing tall after your knockout punch.” It was a rainforest drama that just cried out to me to be painted.

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“BLACK BUTTERFLY”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 40″
Sold

One of the many brilliant forest fliers that one encounters with every visit to the rainforest.

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“HITOY-CERERE RESERVE”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
54″ x54″
Sold

This national park is located in a region of rugged terrain and high humidity, inland from the lowlands and banana plantations of Costa Rica’s Caribbean coast. It rains constantly and intensely throughout the year – approximately 140 inches – with no defined dry season. As a result of this heavy rainfall, the reserve is criss-crossed by innumerable rock-strewn streams and swift white-water rivers. Spectacular waterfalls plunge from considerable heights. The name of the park comes from the Bribri Indian tribe. Hitoy means wooly, a reference to the rocks being coated with thick moss and algae. Cerere means clear waters.

Wild Flowers

“WILDFLOWERS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 36″
Sold

The hills and forests of Costa Rica are filled with wildflowers, offering the eye a banquet of color seemingly everywhere you look.

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“TUCANCILLOS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
36″ x 48″
Sold

Two young birds peer out at an intruder from beneath the shelter of a protective parent. These birds are related to toucans and appear to be just as noisy.

Riego de Flores

“RIEGO DE FLORES”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
24″ x 30″
Sold

With every step on the path, or turn in the road, there is a new burst of floral color to greet the eye and tempt the artist.

King of the Birds

“KING OF THE BIRDS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
24″ x 30″
Sold

One day, at sunset, a majestic marine bird swooped down and, for a moment, seemed to be standing on the churning wave

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“PAPAGAYOS” (MACAWS)
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
30″ x 40″
Sold

You can always tell if there are macaws in the rainforest neighborhood. They make that much noise. Their screeching may be somewhat abrasive but they are a feast for the eyes. The scarlet macaw is one of the most beautiful birds in the world.

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“TWO BIRDS”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
60″ x 40″ (2 panels)
Sold

One day while out walking, I encountered two colorful birds on adjacent trees who seemed to be in a dialogue with each other. Costa Rica is a bird-watchers paradise and sometimes on the trail you encounter “birders” from Europe, Canada, the U.S. or Japan searching the trees with their binoculars.

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“TORTUGUERO”
Oil on canvas with marble sand, beeswax, and wire mesh
48″ x 36″
Sold

On Coasta Rica’s northwast Caribbean corner is a lush area of waterways, marshes, and waterlife. The name comes from the turtles who come to the coastal shores to lay eggs.

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“ISLA BALLENA” (THE WHALE ISLAND)
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
48″ x 36″
Sold

This postcard-like setting is an island off the Pacific coast of central Costa Rica that is shaped like a whale. The scene here is one of many protected mangrove swamps that play a vital ecological role by allowing numerous species of invertebrate marine animals to thrive.

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“BLUE BUTTERFLY” (Two panels)
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
24” x 14”
Sold

The butterfly population in Costa Rica is awesome. No matter where you go in the country there are always butterflies to be seen. Experts say there are about 20,000 butterfly species worldwide. About 1,000 species can be found in Costa Rica.

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“TOP BRANCHES”
Oil on canvas with marble sand and beeswax
24” x 21”
Sold

I’ve done several paintings of the tangled roots of trees, which have always fascinated me because of their great strength (holding up these huge living structures), boundlessly random designs, and the teeming organisms that live in and around them. The top branches are kind of like a mirror of the roots below. They also have great strength, boundless designs, and host many forms of creatures.